Author Archives: maxdunn

Flowing Data through Templates: the Art of Silicon Paginator

Flowing Data through Templates – the Art of Silicon Paginator

For 16 years we at Silicon Publishing have carried on a tradition we first encountered from our former life at Bertelsmann Industry Services (a now defunct company with its own 20-year history): database publishing. We automate the flow of data through templates, producing the entire spectrum of documents that can be generated from data:

  • Catalogs
  • Directories
  • Financial statements
  • Insurance documents
  • Report cards
  • One-to-one marketing pieces
  • Practically anything you can think of…

 

Paginator Documents

The diversity of “data-generated documents” has surprised me ever since I started working in this business. 20 years ago, we were still producing internal phone directories for companies such as Chevron and Mobile, large organizations that spewed forth paper to communicate information before the web took over.

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The Fall and Rise of SVG

The Fall and Rise of SVG

SVG certainly crashed and burned before it rose like a phoenix from the ashes…

Sometime in 1998, a former co-worker who had gone to work at Adobe came by my office at Bertlesmann to inform me of a brand new technology that she knew would excite me: PGML, or “Precision Graphics Markup Language.” This was the Adobe flavor of XML for Vector Graphics. As Jon Warnock put it at the time:

“The PGML proposal solves a growing need for a precise specification that enables members of the Web community to readily and reliably post, control and interact with graphics on the Web.”

I fell for it, hook, line and sinker, and ever since that time, I have followed the standards for XML-based vector graphics closely. PGML (mainly from Adobe) and VML (mainly from Microsoft), as well as a few other similar efforts (Web Schematics, Hyper Graphics Markup Language, WebCGM, and DrawML) soon merged into a “real” W3C standard, called Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG). This promised to serve as a format for rendering interactive vector graphics in Web browsers, which at that time (the era of Netscape Navigator 4.7 and Internet Explorer 5) was only possible with Macromedia Flash.

Completely obvious in the year 2000

What made SVG so cool? It could almost be considered “PostScript for the Web,” so it certainly made sense for Adobe to sponsor and support it in its infancy: with SVG (as with PostScript), art was primarily described via vectors, a method far more efficient (and more naturally “scalable”) than using raster images.

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